In 1973 – $4.99 was then the going rate for a single LP. Then the prices slowly starting climbing over the years, despite Tom Petty’s very public efforts in the early 80s, and vinyl rose bit by bit until it was about $7.99 or $8.99.

When CDs came along in the late 80s, even though they were less expensive to produce, the list prices put them at $14.99 or more. Over the last 10-15 years, the street price has settled at about $11.99 or so, but of course lots of places sell them for more and less than that. Of course now CD prices are dropping in price to compete with digital downloads and they are often costing less than mp3s albums.

After the demise of the original Napster and the rise of iTunes, the $.99 a song model arose and somehow took hold. But in an era where many listen to music free from myspace.com or off of artists’ web sites and others file share, most working musicians are wondering how they will make a living making music when it’s clear you can’t rely on the sale of a physical product any longer.

Enter Amie Street.

Amie Street was started in Providence, Rhode Island on Amie Street on July 4, 2006 by Elliott Breece, Josh Boltuch and Elias Roman while at Brown University. They are now based in Long Island City, just across the river from Manhattan. Roman is the Director of Business Development and Operations, Breece is the Director of Product Development, and Boltuch is the Director Public Relations and Marketing.

The idea is that when a song is added, it starts free up to .98 and will go up in cost as demand rises up to a maximum of .98. Occasionally, shoppers who frequently recommend artists will also get credits from Amie Street, so it’s a bit of a buy back strategy.

The mp3 files are all free of digital rights management, or DRM.

Musicians receive 70% of the revenue from each sale.

Listen to the PodCast here.

We Welcome Your Comments

Comments

4 replies
  1. Seth Tehan says:

    I had actually begun to listen to this podcast before it showed up in my RSS Feed inbox. This was a great podcast that described in detail what amie street does. Also, this podcast told about the rise of Itunes and the Digital Music Industry.

  2. Seth Tehan says:

    I had actually begun to listen to this podcast before it showed up in my RSS Feed inbox. This was a great podcast that described in detail what amie street does. Also, this podcast told about the rise of Itunes and the Digital Music Industry.

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] Mike E. Clark, Soul Assassins, Sa-Ra Creative Partners, U-God, Willy Northpole – June 21, 2009Amie Street Interview – Well Rounded Radio – June 21, 2009Pirate Party Enters the German Parliament – June 21, 2009BUSTA RHYMES […]

  2. […] Mike E. Clark, Soul Assassins, Sa-Ra Creative Partners, U-God, Willy Northpole – June 21, 2009Amie Street Interview – Well Rounded Radio – June 21, 2009Pirate Party Enters the German Parliament – June 21, 2009BUSTA RHYMES […]

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